Typhoon Watch 2014

Typhoon Watch 2014: List of Typhoons in the Philippines

The time has come to again start the list of typhoons for the year, 2014. It’s not that we want typhoons to visit the Philippines — it’s an inescapable fact that around 20 storms visit the Philippines each year. So, just like in the previous years (see the typhoon lists for 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010 and 2009 lists), let’s log each typhoon as it enters the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR). The first typhoon in 2013 came on the 3rd day of the year, while in 2012 it came in June. Drop by from time to time as we update the list of typhoons in the Philippines for 2014.

[For an explanation on the various Storm Warning Signals, see Vacation Tips: Typhoons in the Philippines]

15. OMPONG (International Code: Vongfong). On 7 October 2014 (Tuesday), PAGASA announced that the typhoon with international name “VONGFONG” has entered the PAR and was given the local name “OMPONG”. Its center is located 1,400 km East of Tugueguarao City with maximum sustained winds of 160 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 195 kph. As of 5:00 p.m., it is still too far to affect any part of the country.

14. NENENG (International Code: Phanfone). Typhoon Neneng came and go without much fanfare, which is good. By 4:00 a.m. of 4 October 2014, was located 1,240 km Northeast of Itbayat, Batanes, with maximum sustained winds of 175 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 210 kph.

13. MARIO (International Code: “FUNG-WONG”). At 4:30 p.m. of 17 September 2014 (Wednesday), PAGASA announced that the Low Pressure Area east of Visayas has developed into a Tropical Depression and was named “MARIO”. Estimated maximum winds of 45 kph near the center. Estimated rainfall amount is from 7.5 – 15 mm per hour (moderate – heavy) within the 300 km diameter of the Tropical Depression. No public storm warning has been raised. Typhoon storm signals were raised in various areas  throughout the country. By 5:00 a.m. of Friday, September 19, MARIO had maximum winds of 85kph and gustiness of up to 100 kph, with Public Storm Warning Signal No. 2 raised over Cagayan including Calayan and Babuyan Group of Islands, Isabela, Kalinga, Apayao, Mt. Province, Abra and Ilocos Norte, and SIgnal No. 1 over Aurora, Quirino, Nueva Vizcaya, Ifugao, Benguet, Ilocos Sur, La Union and Batanes Group of Islands. Heavy flooding was experienced in different areas, including Cebu and Metro Manila.

12.LUIS (International Code: “LAMAEGI”). On 12 September 2014 (Friday), PAGASA announced that the Tropical Depression east of Visayas has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named “LUIS”. By 11:00 a.m. of Sunday (September 14), Signal No. 3 was raised over Cagayan including Babuyan and Calayan Group of Islands, Apayao, Ilocos Norte, Abra, Kalinga, Isabela, Mt. Province, Ilocos Sur, Ifugao, Northern Aurora and Quirino; Signal No. 2 over Batanes Group of Islands, La Union, Benguet, Nueva Vizcaya, Pangasinan, Nueva Ecija and rest of Aurora; and Signal No. 1 over Tarlac, Zambales, Pampanga, Bulacan, Northern Quezon and Pollilo Island. The typhoon stayed in the Philippines for several days, leaving the Philippine Area of Responsibility by 4:00 p.m. of 15 September 2014 (Monday).

11. KARDING. On 6 September 2014, the low pressure area west of northwest of Iba, Zambales has developed into a Tropical Depression, with estimated maximum sustained winds of 45 kph near the center, and was name “KARDING”. No public storm warning was raised, with a note that KARDING will not affect any part of the country. It went our of the Philippine Area of Responsibility on the same day. The controversy over the change of name from the original KANOR to KARDING was happily more eventful than the effect of the typhoon.

10. JOSE (International Code: “HALONG”). At 7:15 pm of 2 August 2014, PAGASA issued its first severe weather bulletin, announcing that the typhoon east of Central Luzon has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named “Jose”. It has an estimated maximum sustained winds of 160 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 195 kph. Maximum sustained winds of 160 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 195 kph. It will not yet affect any part of the country. However, the Southwest Monsoon will bring occasional rains over Metro Manila, Central Luzon, Ilocos Region, CALABARZON and MIMAROPA.

9. INDAY (International Code: “NAKRI”). On 29 July 2014, PAGASA announced that the low pressure area east of Aparri, Cagayan has developed into a Tropical Depression and was named “INDAY” with no public storm signal raised. INDAY made an exit from the PAR on 31 July 2014.

8. HENRY (International Code: “MATMO”). On 18 July 2014, PAGASA announced that the tropical storm east of Northern Mindanao has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named “HENRY” with no public storm warning signal raised at that time. HENRY was outside the PAR by 23 July and was on its way to Taiwan.

7. GLENDA (International Code: “RAMMASUN,” a Siamese word meaning “Thunder God”). On 13 July 2014, PAGASA announced that the Tropical Storm east of Bicol entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named “GLENDA.” It made landfall on 15 July and left the PAR on July 17. According to NDRRMC, GLENDA is the 7th tropical cyclone which entered the PAR in 2014 and the 2nd recorded typhoon to enter the PAR after FLORITA. GLENDA is also the 2nd tropical cyclone to make landfall.

6. FLORITA (International Code: “NEOGURI”). On 5 July 2014, PAGASA announced that the typhoon east northeast of Casiguran, Aurora entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility and name “FLORITA.” It went out of the PAR on 8 July 2014.

5. ESTER (International Code: “MITAG”). On 10 June 2014, the low pressure area near Basco, Batanes has developed into a Tropical Depression and was named “ESTER.” By 11 June 2014, PAGASA announced that tropical storm ESTER has gained more strength but it was already moving out of the Philippine Area of Responsibility.

4. DOMENG (International Code: “PEIPAH”). On 6 April 2014, PAGASA announced that the Tropical Storm east of Southern Mindanao is about to enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR). By 10:00 a.m. of April 7, the center of the storm was 770 km east of Davao City. It weakened into a low pressure area by 10 April 2014.

3. CALOY. On 21 MARCH 2014, 5:00 a.m., PAGASA issued Weather Bulletin No. 1, announcing that the low pressure area east of Mindanao has developed into a tropical depression and was named “CALOY”. By 11:00 a.m., Public Storm Warning Signal No. 1 (winds of 30-60 kph is expected within the next 36 hours) was raised over Davao Oriental, Davao del Norte, Compostela Valley, Northern part of Davao del Sur incl. Davao City, Surigao del Sur, Surigao del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Agusan del Norte, North Cotabato, Bukidnon and Misamis Oriental. By 5:00 p.m. of Saturday, 22 March, PAGASA issued its final bulletin, advising that “Caloy” has weakened into a Low Pressure Area after made landfall in Surigao del Sur.

2. BASYANG (International Code: Kajiki). On 30 January 2014, PAGASA raised Public Storm Warning Signal No. 1 over Surigao Del Norte, Siargao Island, Surigao Del Sur, Dinagat Province, Misamis Oriental and Southern Leyte.

1. AGATON. On 17 January 2014, a Friday, PAGASA issued Weather Bulletin Number ONE, announcing that the low pressure area southeast of Guiuan, Eastern Samar has developed into a tropical depression and was named “Agaton”.

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