Typhoon Watch 2011: List of Typhoons

The state of the weather affects our travels, vacations and pretty much everything that we do. We should always be mindful of severe weather conditions, like typhoons or tropical storms (called cyclones and hurricanes somewhere else in the planet). Considering that an average of 20 storms visit the Philippines each year, it may be worth something to list down the typhoons as they hit the Philippine area of responsibility (see 2012 list, 2009 and 2010 lists). Please check from time to time for more updates (presented in reverse chronology).

19. Sendong (International Code/Name: Washi). If we’re keeping tab of the most destructive typhoon of the year, then 2011 saved the “best” for last. On 15 December 2011 (11:00 a.m.), PAGASA issued its first severe weather bulletin for Sendong, announcing that this Tropical Depression east of Mindanao has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), with estimated maximum winds of 55 kph near the center. By 5:00 p.m., Public Storm Warning Signal No. 1 was raised in 11 provinces in Visayas and Mindanao, raised to Signal No. 2 by 11:00 p.m. While Sendong did not exceed Signal No. 2, the heavy rains it brought caused massive flooding, loss of life and property, in various places Mindanao including Cagayan de Oro and Iligan. At 10:30 p.m. of 18 December 2011, PAGASA announced that Sendong has left the PAR. As of 28 December 2011, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) readjusted the death toll caused by storm “Sendong” from 1,453 to 1,249 after basing it on existing “body counts.” This figure does not include those who are missing or injured, or the number of houses and establishments destroyed by Sendong.

18. Ramon. At 11:00 a.m., Monday, 10 October 2011, PAGASA announced that the Active Low Pressure Area (ALPA) east of Mindanao has developed into a Tropical Depression, named “RAMON”. At 5:00 p.m. of the same day, Storm Signal No. 1 was raised in parts of Mindanao (Surigao Del Norte, Siargao Island, Surigao Del Sur, Dinagat Group of Islands), expanded to Visayas (Eastern Samar, Western Samar, Leyte Provinces, Bohol, Biliran, Camotes Island) at 5:00 a.m. of October 11.

17. Quiel (International Code: Nalgae). On 29 September 2011 (5:00 a.m.), just a day after the destructive typhoon Pedring left the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), PAGASA announced that the Tropical Storm east of Northern Luzon has entered the PAR and was named “QUIEL”. It has maximum sustained winds of 105 kph near the center, with gustiness of up to 135 kph.

16. Pedring. On 24 September 2011 (Saturday, 5:00 p.m.), PAGASA announced that the tropical storm east of Southern Luzon has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility. The first public storm warning signal was not raised until the next day, 25 September 2011 (11:00 a.m.), with Signal No. 1 in Catanduanes, Albay and Camarines Sur. By 5:00 a.m. of Monday, 26 September 2011, Signal No. 1 was expanded to Albay, Burias Island, Sorsogon, Quezon, Quirino, Ifugao, Nueva Vizcaya, Mt. Province, Kalinga, and Cagayan, while Signal No. 2 was raised in the provinces of Isabela, Aurora, Catanduanes, Polillo Island, Camarines Norte, and Camarines Sur. By 5:00 p.m. of September 26, which happens to be the anniversary of the very destructive typhoon Ondoy, warning signals were raised, with Signal No. 3 declared for the provinces of Catanduanes, Camarines Sur, Camarines Norte, Northern Quezon, Polillo Island, Aurora, Quirino, and Isabela (among the areas with Signal No. 2 is Metro Manila). Pedring left the PAR on 28 September 2011, leaving behind death and destruction in its wake. One of the destructive typhoons of 2011.

15. Onyok (International Code: Roke). On 12 September 2011 (8:00 p.m.), PAGASA announced that the Tropical Depression east-northeast of Basco, Batanes has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named “ONYOK”. No storm warning signal was raised, as Onyok was too far to directly affect any part of the country. Onyok made an exit after a few hours.

14. Nonoy (International Code: Kulap). On 8 Semptember 2011 (10:30 a.m.), PAGASA announced that the Tropical Storm east northeast of Northern Luzon has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named “NONOY”, with maximum sustained winds of 65 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 80 kph. No public storm signal was raised and Nonoy left the PAR less than 24 hours from its entry.

Typhoon Mina, sattelite image as of 26 August 2011 5pm, courtesy of PAGASA

13. Mina (International Name: Nanmadol). In its first severe weather bulletin (11:00 p.m., Sunday, 21 August 2011), the PAGASA announced that the Low Pressure Area East of Visayas has developed into a Tropical Depression and was named “MINA”. No storm signal was then raised. By the 14th bulletin (5:00 p.m., Friday, 26 August 2011), the highest possible storm signal — Signal No. 4 (more than 185 kph winds) — was raised in Northern Cagayan. Signal No. 3 (100-185 kph winds) was still in effect in Isabela, Rest of Cagayan, Calayan, Babuyan Group of Island, Batanes Group of Island.

12. Lando. At 6:30 p.m. of 31 July 2011, even before Kabayan could leave the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), PAGASA announced that the active Low Pressure Area west of Northern Luzon has developed into a Tropical Depression, named “LANDO”.

11. Kabayan (International Code: Muifa). At 5:00 p.m. of 28 July 2011, a Thursday, PAGASA announced that the Tropical Depression east of Visayas has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and intensified into a Tropical Storm, named “KABAYAN”, with maximum winds of 65 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 80 kph. Still no public storm signal as of the 7th severe weather bulletin issued on 31 July 2011, 11:00 a.m.

10. Juaning (International Code: Nock-ten). At 11:00 a.m. of Monday, 25 July 2011, PAGASA released its Severe Weather Bulletin Number One, announcing that the low pressure area east of Visayas has developed into a Tropical Depression and was named “JUANING”, with maximum winds of 55 kph near the center. The first storm signal was not raised until 5:00 p.m. that day (Catanduanes, Signal No. 1), with the same storm signal extended to Sorsogon, Albay, Camarines Provinces, and Cagayan by 5:30 p.m., further to Isabela, Quirino, Aurora, Quezon, Polillo Island by 11:00 p.m., and to Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur, Abra, Apayao, Kalinga, Ifugao, Mt. Province, La Union, Pangasinan, Benguet, Nueva Vizcaya and Nueva Ecija as of 5:00 a.m. of the next day, July 26.

9. Ineng (International Code: “Ma-on”). The typhoon entered the Philippine area of reponsibility (PAR) around 11:00 a.m. of 17 July 2011, a Sunday, leaving the PAR late in the evening, headed for Okinawa, Japan.

8. Hanna (International Code: Tokage). On 15 July 2011, at 5:00 p.m., the PAGASA first announced the existence of this tropical depression 890 kilometers East of Virac, Catanduanes. It is not expected to directly affect any part of the country.

7. Goring. On 9 July 2011, at around 5:00 p.m., PAGASA first issued a severe weather bulletin announcing that the Low Pressure Area (LPA) northeast of Batanes has developed into a Tropical Depression and was named “GORING”, although no public storm signals were raised. It has an expected strength of 55 kph near the center.

6. Falcon (International Code: “Meari”). The low pressure area east of Visayas has developed into a Tropical Depression (per PAGASA Severe Weather Bulletin Number One, issued at 11:00 a.m., Tuesday, 21 June 2011). The location of center, as of 10:00 a.m., is 670 km East of Borongan, Easter Samar, with maximum sustained winds of 55 kph, with no storm signals yet raised.

5. Egay (International Name: “Egay”). At around 5:45 a.m., Friday, 17 June 2011, PAGASA first announced that the low pressure area east of Mindanao has developed into a tropical depression and was named EGAY. Public storm signal No. 1 was raised, in the 3rd bulletin at 5:00 p.m., over Catanduanes, Norther Samar and Eastern Samar (maximum sustained winds of 55 kph near the center). As of the 12th weather bulleting (11:00 p.m., Sunday, 19 June 2011), tropical depresssion “EGAY” is over the Babuyan Group of Islands, with Signal No. 1 (45-60 kph winds) over Cagayan, Calayan, Babuyan Group of Islands, Batanes Group of Islands, Apayao and Ilocos Norte.

4. Dodong (International Code: Sarika). On 9 June 2011 (Thursday, 12:00 p.m.) PAGASA announced that the low pressure area West of Metro Manila has developed into a tropical depression, with maximum sustained winds of 55 kph near the center. Storm Signal No. 1 was immediately issued for Bataan, Pampanga, Tarlac, Zambales, Pangasinan, Cavite and Metro Manila. By the second severe weather bulleting at 5:00 p.m. of the same day, the storm warning for Cavite and Metro Manila was removed.

3. Chedeng (International Code: Songda). In its Severe Weather Bulletin Number One issued at 5:00 a.m. of 23 May 2011, PAGASA announced that the tropical storm East of Northern Mindanao has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR). By the second bulletin issued at 11:00 a.m. of 23 May, the center of the storm is located 795 kms East of Guiuan, Eastern Samar. No public storm warning signals have been raised to date.

2. Bebeng (International Code: Aere). On 6 May 2011, the PAGASA issued its Severe Weather Bulletin No. 1 (as of 11 p.m., Friday), announcing that the Low Pressure Area (LPA) East of Visayas has intensified into a tropical depression. By the fourth tropical storm warning issued on 7 May 2011 (5:00 p.m.), “Bebeng” has intensified into a storm and threatens the Bicol region. The location of center is 220 km East of Legaspi City, with maximum winds of 65 kph near the center. Signal No. 2 (60-100 kph winds) is raised in Sorsogon, Albay, Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, and Northern Samar, while Signal No. 1 (30-60 kph winds) is raised in Masbate, Ticao Island, Burias Island, Camarines Norte, Quezon, Polillo Island, Aurora, Marinduque, Eastern Samar, and Western Samar.

1. Amang. – On 4 April 2011, the first typhoon to enter the Philippine area of responsibility was recorded. It was spotted 970 kilometers east of Borongan, Eastern Samar, with a sustained winds of 55 kph. PAGASA didn’t expect it to strengthen into a storm.

8 thoughts on “Typhoon Watch 2011: List of Typhoons”

  1. nice article. we’ve also started watching Typhoon Dodong and fortunately, it was not as strong as the past typhoons we had.

    -Anne

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